Megax camera

A regular camera has a pixel size of 0.9 µm, but the pixel size in MegaX is ten times larger, at 9 µm. “Our team is already working on a next-generation MegaX with a pixel size of 2.2 µm” adds Charbon.

According to EPFL School of Engineering’s Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory head Edoardo Charbon, the MegaX camera behind this new video is the by-product of around 15 years of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) research.

“MegaX is the culmination of over 15 years of research on single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), which are photodetectors used in next-generation image-sensor technology.” And Charbon has good reason to be proud, since he and his research team have developed the world’s first million-pixel camera.

A regular camera has a pixel size of 0.9 µm, but the pixel size in MegaX is ten times larger, at 9 µm. “Our team is already working on a next-generation MegaX with a pixel size of 2.2 µm” adds Charbon.

With standard cameras, very light and very dark areas in a picture are saturated – our eyes see only black and white. But with MegaX, we can see both light and dark objects equally well. “MegaX lets you increase the dynamic range substantially, far beyond what you can do with a high-definition camera,” says Charbon.

MegaX is the culmination of over 15 years of research on single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), which are photodetectors used in next-generation image-sensor technology.” And Charbon has good reason to be proud, since he and his research team have developed the world’s first million-pixel camera. Their findings have just been published in Optica.

A regular camera has a pixel size of 0.9 µm, but the pixel size in MegaX is ten times larger, at 9 µm. “Our team is already working on a next-generation MegaX with a pixel size of 2.2 µm” adds Charbon.

Researchers have developed the first megapixel photon-counting camera based on single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) image sensors. The new camera can capture images in faint light at unprecedented speeds. Credit: Arianna M. Charbon, Kazuhiro Morimoto, Edoardo Charbon

Connaissez vous la caméra MegaX ? Cet outil révolutionnaire peut saisir 1 million de pixels en 3,8 nanosecondes et filmer 24 000 images par seconde ! On vous explique tout dans cette vidéo …